Update on Gardasil vaccine: yes, it is safe and effective


“Should I give my kid the Gardasil® vaccine?” Friends and relatives, as well as our patients’ parents, continue to ask us this question.

Our answer is always: “Yes.”

Gardasil® vaccine is the current HPV vaccine on the United States market. The vaccine prevents cancer-causing strains of human papillomavirus from infecting a person’s body. HPV cancers include cervical cancer in women, penile cancers in men, and cancers of the mouth and throat in everyone. The vaccine also protects against genital warts. Continue Reading

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Another measles outbreak: recognize measles in your child

recognize measles

A typical measles rash, courtesy of the public health library, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

It saddens us that we need to post about how to recognize measles, but the recent measles outbreaks in the United States force parents to be vigilant for a disease that was nearly eradicated in this country.

Both an increase in international travel and a decrease in parents vaccinating their kids is thought to be responsible for the increase in measles cases.

Measles typically starts out looking like a really bad cold
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How to burp a baby

Wondering how to burp a baby? We decided that words just didn’t convey what to do. So we introduce baby Emma in her first, and our first, how-to-video.

Any other video requests, send them our way.

Julie Kardos, MD and Naline Lai, MD
©2019 Two Peds in a Pod®

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Four month sleep regression

Tired parents, four month sleep regression“I think we just hit the four month sleep regression. My baby used to sleep better, and now at four months, she is waking up every hour! What happened?”

Sound familiar?

The term “four month sleep regression” did not appear on Google searches in the United States until 2006 and has been on the rise ever since. Continue Reading

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How to dress baby (and big kids) for winter

dress baby for winter

Dr. Kardos’s fourth child wears her coat without fuss in cold weather.

Now that the weather has turned “freezy,” parents ask us how to dress their baby (and big kids) for cold weather. Even Dr. Kardos’s teenaged kids allow her to  thrust winter coats on them as they head out to the bus stop. Wondering how to know if your baby, toddler, or older child are dressed correctly for the weather? Read our post on this topic.

Stay warm!

Naline Lai, MD and Julie Kardos, MD
©2019 Two Peds in a Pod®

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Happy New Year 2019! Read our top three posts of 2018

celebrate our top 3 posts

photo from pixabay

Happy 2019! As 2018 comes to a close, we invite you to read our most popular three posts of the year.

Here they are, in order of number of hits:

#1: It’s a gas! your young infant’s burps and farts

#2: It’s no laughing matter: another tween game in town

#3: Kids with “pink eye” CAN attend daycare, and other updated school exclusion recommendations

We wish all of our Two Peds readers and all of your children a Happy, Healthy, and Peaceful 2019.

Sincerely,

Julie Kardos, MD and Naline Lai, MD

©2019 Two Peds in a Pod®

 

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Help prevent your teen from playing risky games

Prevent your teen from taking unnecessary risks

Some games are riskier than others and it’s hard for teens to tell the difference.

Remember playing “Truth or Dare” as a kid? Some of the dares were silly, some potentially embarrassing, but some were downright risky. Now our children are playing potentially dangerous games. How can you prevent your teen from taking unnecessary risks?

To understand why kids would play risky games such as the Cinnamon Challenge or the Laughing Game, let’s step into the mindset of a teenager. Don’t let their adult-like appearances deceive you. Based on what we know about teenage brain development, teens are more likely to misinterpret or mislead social cues and emotions and to engage in risky behavior. Even though your teens may be taller than you, their deductive reasoning skills are not fully developed until around 25 years old. They have difficulty thinking through long term plans.

Take a simple example of studying. If they stay up very late studying, they do not consider that this will cause impairment in cognition the next day and consequently they are forced to stay up Continue Reading

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